Prof. J. Raynien Kwo

Prof. J. Raynien Kwo

Brief Bio

    Prof. J. Raynien Kwo is currently the Distinguished Chair Professor in the department of physics, National Tsing Hua University (NTHU). Raynien received her BS degree from the Physics Department of NTU in 1975, and went to US to pursue the graduate study in Stanford University, CA. After obtaining her PhD in Applied Physics in 1981, she joined Bell Labs, Physics Research Division in Murray Hill, New Jersey as a member of technical staff, and later became a distinguished member of the technical staff in 2001. In 2003 she returned to Taiwan to promote higher education and advanced research for physics in her native land. She directed the NTHU Physics Department as the Chair during 2005-2008, and led the Taiwan Physical Society as the President in 2008-2009. She was the Director of the Center for the Condensed Matter Sciences in NTU (2010-2012).

    Prof. Kwo is internationally well known for her outstanding research in novel electronic materials invented by advanced thin film fabrication techniques, especially for her pioneering work that laid the foundation for the field of artificial magnetic superlattices during the mid 80¡¦s. With her pioneer work in metal molecular beam epitaxy, she discovered long-range antiferromagnetic coupling mediated in synthetic rare-earth magnetic superlattices, as identified to be the fundamental mechanism responsible for the giant magneto-resistance effect awarded with the Physics Nobel Prize in 2007. Later, in the field of high temperature superconducting films, she was the first to invent the oxide molecular-beam epitaxy to produce single crystalline HTSC films crucial for fundamental studies of anisotropic normal state properties. In her recent research on ¡§oxide electronics¡¨, she spearheaded the development of alternative high-k gate dielectrics for Si CMOS beyond 45 nm node. She also co-invented new high-k dielectrics including a mixed oxide Ga2O3(Gd2O3) and a binary oxide Gd2O3 to unpin the Fermi level of the III-V InGaAs semiconductor surface for the first time, vital for the realization of InGaAs MOSFETs.


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